Sunday, February 11, 2007

Public Conveniences



When Beccy was over visiting recently we got caught short during our walk and made a visit. The building was very clean but the above caught my eye and I was quite shocked as I have never seen this so publicly displayed anywhere else. I may be old and/or naive but is it giving the wrong message or is it just a sign of the times and actually a way of getting those who use the facilities for this purpose to act responsibly and safely dispose of used needles. Do you have a view??

19 Comments:

At 11/2/07 15:50, Anonymous swampwitch said...

Do you think this is directed to diabetics who need insulin?

 
At 11/2/07 17:14, Blogger ChrisB said...

Unfortunately no. Athough a beauty spot and open spaces used for walking and sport, I think at night the area is used very differently.

 
At 11/2/07 17:49, Blogger Beccy said...

Caught short of change prehaps Mum?

I think it's sensible if there are children around during the day that facilities are there to dispose of dangerous items that may be used in the area at night.

 
At 11/2/07 18:34, Blogger cookiecrumb said...

It's shocking, but enlightened and realistic.
I have never seen such a thing in San Francisco, but I have seen discarded syringes on the sidewalk. I guess I'd prefer the safe disposal method.
Buncha bums. Hmph.

 
At 11/2/07 20:24, Blogger ChrisB said...

Beccy I'm sure you are right

CC I have never seen it anywhere else but then I don't visit all the WC's in Bristol !!! Would you believe about a year ago I found a syringe in my front garden behind the cherry tree.

 
At 11/2/07 20:52, Blogger Asha said...

Better to have this than not having one to throw and throw all over the place putting others in danger!! Good for them to think of this disposer!

 
At 11/2/07 21:01, Blogger Sam said...

I am even more naieve because when I first saw the picture I thought it must be a receptacle for the disposal of old, unloved pens

 
At 11/2/07 22:00, Blogger Barbara said...

I remember being quite shocked when I saw one at Auckland airport some years ago. However I had need of one when travelling back from Portugal after becoming ill while on holiday and requiring surgery. I was on a course of anti clotting injections (the hospital staff kindly taught Bryan to administer them) and timing required me to have one while transiting Madrid airport. We found a quiet corner in the first class lounge, Bryan gave me the injection (in my tummy, just below the navel)and then set off to find one of those bins to drop the needle in. So they do have a use other than for addicts needles. I'd like to add surgery is not a method I'd recommend for a free upgrade to first or business class.

 
At 12/2/07 02:06, Blogger Mimi said...

I have seen "sharps" in some very unusual places, so i guess this is a good idea. A sad one, though.

 
At 12/2/07 12:27, Blogger mjd said...

Yes, that is a scary thought to see that sign displayed so publicly. Come visit me at Mama Said, Papa Said to see the interesting sign displayed outside my window. My sign is part of Marnie's Fun Monday Why I Love Where I Live

 
At 12/2/07 14:17, Blogger Sally Lomax said...

I agree .........

Sad sign of the times perhaps, but much better to have everything safely disposed of. I worry about my children encountering things like this. Also - as in Barbara's case, sometimes it's necessary anyway for other reasons.

 
At 12/2/07 14:51, Anonymous min said...

Keeping the innocent safe. This is a good thing.

 
At 12/2/07 16:05, Blogger ChrisB said...

barbara, mimi, sally, mjd, min It is sad but I guess necessary for general health and safety, and you are right there are lots of health reasons for having the facility so I should probably be praising the authorities for their forward thinking. Thanks for the comments.

 
At 12/2/07 18:14, Anonymous elena jane said...

it IS a sad sign of the times. i just wonder how much the addition of these receptacles has helped clean up the area?!?

 
At 12/2/07 18:42, Blogger ChrisB said...

elena jane I wondered the same myself

 
At 12/2/07 23:06, Anonymous Willowtree said...

The theory is good: put in a bin so that our children don't run the risk of getting accidentally infected by a discarded needle.

Unfortunately the reality is that most thrill seeking addicts have scant regard for their own well being and even less for others (long term 'responsible' addicts do it at home, as do diabetics). The result being that the needles will be found in a 100 metre radius around the facility.

I'm all for supporting people with a problem, but I'm less inclined to make the effort for self inflicted wounds.

 
At 13/2/07 14:39, Blogger ChrisB said...

willow tree you're right ( your last comment), I haven't printed my husband's comments on the subject !!

 
At 14/2/07 12:00, Blogger Little Miss Moi said...

Dear ChrisB. Where I grew up in Brisbane, there were sharps boxes in most toilets so I probably wouldn't have noticed that sign. But Willowtree is right, most people who have a needle to discard in the vicinity of a public loo will do so on the ground... We were camping in France in September and on the second day I found a syringe next to our tent. It freaked me out - I panicked and couldn't remember if I'd been walking around barefoot. Ruined my perception of that whole area. It was awful.

 
At 14/2/07 22:04, Blogger ChrisB said...

little miss moi I think that would have freaked me out as well and on a camp site there are all the children running around who could have picked it up. thanks for dropping by

 

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